‘Dead Alive’ – You’ll Never Want to Eat Custard Again

dead-alive

For day three of our 5th Annual Macabre Month of Horror Sam Kench and James Lown review Peter Jackson’s 1992 gore-fest ‘Dead Alive’ AKA ‘Brain Dead’.

Day Three: Peter Jackson’s ‘Dead Alive’

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Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

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Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #11 “1408”

1408 Stephen King book into movie for the macabre month of horror

1408 Stephen King book into movie for the macabre month of horrorWelcome to the 11th day of our Fourth Annual Macabre Month of Horror. Today’s review is a Jumping Off Point review on the movie “1408” Based on a short story by Stephen King, a man who specializes in debunking the paranormal checks into the infamous room 1408 in the Dolphin Hotel, only to discover… the terror is real.

Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

Remember to visit every day for the latest video review. Or just subscribe to our posts by entering  your email over where it says SUBSCRIBE on the right hand side of the screen and get our posts in your inbox.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #11 “1408

If you like what Sam has to say about the movie and want to watch it for yourself, CLICK HERE to see it via Amazon instant video.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #10 “Creep”

creep macabre month of horror

creepWelcome to the 10th day of our Fourth Annual Macabre Month of Horror. Today’s review is on the obscure b-movie “Creep

Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

Remember to visit every day for the latest video review. Or just subscribe to our posts by entering  your email over where it says SUBSCRIBE on the right hand side of the screen and get our posts in your inbox.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #10 “Creep

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #8 “Vacancy”

vacancy poster

vacancy posterWelcome to the 8th day of our Fourth Annual Macabre Month of Horror. Today’s review is on the movie “Vacancy

“Vacancy” draws influence from Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho“.Both involve a motel run by a crazy killer who preys on his guests. They really shot for the Hitchcock feel with this movie. There is a cool opening credit sequence that looks and sounds like something out of an old Hitchcock thriller. The pacing and even the tone are similar to Hitchcock films. Vacancy is darker and, visually, is more modern, but it’s a nice little send off to Hitchcock. Other little references, like stuffed birds on the motel desk are a nice touch.

Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

Remember to visit every day for the latest video review. Or just subscribe to our posts by entering  your email over where it says SUBSCRIBE on the right hand side of the screen and get our posts in your inbox.

 

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #8 “Vacancy”

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #7 “The Orphanage”

the orphanage

orphanage posterWelcome to the 7th day of our Fourth Annual Macabre Month of Horror. Today’s review is on the movie “The Orphanage“.

The Orphanage tells the story of Laura, a woman who has moved back with her husband and adopted son into the orphanage in which she grew up. They plan on starting a home for disabled children, but there appear to be ghosts at work. “The Orphanage” is a prime ghost story.  It is creepy on many levels, hauntingly beautiful and one of the saddest horror movies you will ever see with a bittersweet ending that might just make you tear up.

Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

Remember to visit every day for the latest video review. Or just subscribe to our posts by entering  your email over where it says SUBSCRIBE on the right hand side of the screen and get our posts in your inbox.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #7 “The Orphanage

If you liked what Sam had to say about “The Orphanage” and want to watch it for yourself, CLICK HERE  to watch it on Amazon Instant Video.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #4 “The Descent”

"The Descent"

the descentWelcome to the 4th day of our Fourth Annual Macabre Month of Horror. Today’s review is on the movie “The Descent”.

Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

Remember to visit every day for the latest video review. Or just subscribe to our posts by entering  your email over where it says SUBSCRIBE on the right hand side of the screen and get our posts in your inbox.

If you like what Sam had to say in his video review and want to watch “The Descent”  Click here  to watch it via Amazon Instant Video.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #4 “The Descent”

Description from Amazon: One year after a tragic accident, six girlfriends meet in a remote part of the Appalachians for their annual caving trip. Deep below the surface of the earth, disaster strikes when a rock falls and blocks their route back to the surface. The group splinters and each push on, praying for another exit. But there is something else lurking under the earth – a race of monstrous humanoid creatures that are adapted perfectly to life in the dark. As the friends realize they are now prey, they are forced to unleash their most primal instincts in an all-out war against an unspeakable horror – one that attacks without warning, again and again and again.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #3 “Wolf Creek”

wolf creek

wolf creekWelcome to the third day of our Fourth Annual Macabre Month of Horror. Today’s review is on the movie “Wolf Creek” where three young backpackers experience a terrifying journey after being abducted in the isolated Australian Outback.

Please keep in mind these are Horror Movies and the video reviews contain content from the films that may not be appropriate for younger viewers, or those with a weak constitution for that matter.

Remember to visit every day for the latest video review. Or just subscribe to our posts by entering  your email over where it says SUBSCRIBE on the right hand side of the screen and get our posts in your inbox.

If you like what Sam has to say about the movie and want to watch it for yourself, Click Here to see it via Amazon instant video.

Macabre Month of Horror: Movie Review #3 “Wolf Creek”

 

 

Stuffed animals inspired by Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Reservoir Dogs’

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The team of Re-Cyco Dogs has been fully assemble and ready to rock their first movie trailer parody.

As you all know, S is an aspiring film maker and his favorite director is Quentin Tarantino. I started making these little guys and popped a collar and tie on one and bang, an idea was born. I asked him to recreate one of the official “Reservoir Dogs” movie trailers using these cute guys.

But of course there are more than just Mr. Pink, Mr. Blonde, Mr. Orange, Mr. Brown, Mr. White and Mr. Blue in the trailer so other characters were needed.

Joe and Nice Guy Eddie put the team together in the movie, but Sam thought they should be Bulldogs rather than Scotty Dogs. I decided to use a left over log cabin quilt block of blues and purples to make Nice Dog Eddie to sort of match the windbreaker worn by Nice Guy Eddie played by Chris Penn in the movie.

Speaking of left overs. All the stuffed animals are hand sewn using recycled materials. That’s why I call them the Re-Cyco Dogs.

There is a scene with Mr. Pink, played by Steve Buscemi, pulling a woman out of a car when he was running away from the cops. This scene was used in all the movie trailers. Below is a still shot from the movie. Below that is a photo of my version of Mr. Pink and a very surprised cat.

There is a scene with Mr. Pink, played by Steve Buscemi, pulling a woman out of a car when he was running away from the cops. This scene was used in all the movie trailers. Below is a still shot from the movie. Below that is a photo of my version of Mr. Pink and a very surprised cat.
We also needed four police officers to complete the trailer. Three that chase Mr. Pink when he makes his getaway and the one officer, Marvin Nash, who is kidnapped by Michael Madsen‘s character, Mr. Blonde.
Given we were making a spoof on a Tarantino movie where the criminals have zero respect for the cops, we made the cops pigs.
 Here’s my little handmade version of Mr. Blonde and police officer Marvin Nash with a quote from that iconic scene where he cuts his ear off. I stitched long strands of red thread for the blood where that little pig’s ear should be. Now I’ve got “Stuck in the Middle with You” stuck in my head.

Thank you Quentin Tarantino for all you do.

Film making through cultures

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

By Sam Kench

Crouching Tiger, Hidden DragonThere are many countries in the world that have their own film industry, but many American kids have only seen a few if any foreign films. There is nothing at all wrong with American movies, but only ever viewing American movies stops people from experiencing the full gamut of styles, tones, and even emotions that the medium of film has to offer.

the killerThe movies a country produces represents the country itself. Different countries focus on different genres of film, and the chosen genre of film can say a lot about how people from that country think. It can show what people find entertaining, what they are conditioned to accept, and it can demonstrate how one culture differs from another.

hard boiledThere are handful of countries that can be used to demonstrate just how different of a movie a culture can produce. China, England, France, South Korea, Taiwan, and India all have different niches and styles.

heroThere was a time when China dominated the world with their Hong Kong action cinema. Although China produces films from all genres, their niche is action movies. Martial arts films and shoot ‘em ups headed by the likes of people such as Bruce Lee, Chow Yun Fat, and Jackie Chan. Chinese action films became known as the best in the world and the country has been since associated with this genre. The films can aim for entertainment and intensity in films such as “Hard Boiled or The Killer, or they can aim for Poetic beauty in films such as “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon or “Hero. The action films made in China would become refined to the point of art. Director John Woo choreographed such elaborate shootouts that his films became known as “Bullet Ballets” or “Bullet Operas” because of the complexity of the action. It grew to the point where a gunfight could say something poetic.

I Saw the DevilTaiwan is a country that eventually grew itself a name in action films. Actions films from Taiwan developed their own specific style. Taiwanese action films have a sense of humor that is very specific to the country and you can tell a film is from Taiwan based purely on directing style. The direction of Taiwanese films has not developed much beyond the old customs of 80’s cinema. Most film industries are still accepting of slow motion, but instant replays are a thing of the past in most countries. Taiwan however still embraces instant replays. Taiwanese action films aim to show you something cool and let you enjoy it, rather than being concerned with telling a deep story.

OldboyDifferent countries focus on different genres. While a country like China or Taiwan focuses on action films as its priority, France focuses on a different genre. France also produces its share of action films, but France has a particular penchant for romance and drama films. Countries can do films in all genres but they tend to zero in on one in particular. China does action, France does romance and drama, England does crime and mystery, Japan and Australia do horror, etc. etc.

Sympathy for Mr. VengeanceSometimes you can tell which country a film comes from based on how they tell the story. Take South Korea and England for example. South Korean films tend to tell incredibly emotional stories with heavy poetic elements. South Korean films such as I Saw the Devil, “Oldboy, and Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance tell their stories visually. These films have very little dialogue and the stories are propelled by the striking images that they present to the audience. A great deal of effort and creativity is put into the composition of every shot.

Films coming from England tend to rely on dialogue to tell the story rather than the visuals. Both work perfectly fine for the stories they are trying to tell, but the point is that they are different. The culture of a country influences the media it produces. (More to come on films from England in Part II)

NRHS Project Promise Head Not Qualified for Job

filming at library3

By Sam Kench

ystl 1 cover cropped

When Beth Colby left the district this school year her job of running after school Project Promise and handling the school’s ELO program was split into two positions. Amy Yeakle took over the ELO side of her duties, and the Project Promise aspect was filled by Lori Lane. Before Christmas break Ms. Lane viewed the Newfound Filmmaking Club’s sketch comedy show “Yes Son That is a Lion” After viewing it and deeming it offensive she informed the superintendent of her opinion. Without watching the video, superintendent Stacy Buckley ordered that all copies of the DVD be confiscated. Vice Principal Paul Hoiriis confiscated the remaining DVDs so that they could no longer be sold, with the stipulation that they would be returned at the end of the day. The DVDs were not returned at that time.

Ms. Lane offered to go through the video and point out which parts she found offensive. After the offer was accepted she recanted and refused to discuss the matter further. Ms. Lane has not responded to emails regarding the matter.

While in possession of the DVDs, Mr. Hoiriis and Ms. Lane claimed that the school (Project Promise) had ownership over the DVDs. Ms. Lane claimed that the school had paid for the DVDs and cases making them school property. The DVDs and cases were not purchased by the school. The materials used in the production of the DVDs were purchased independently by film making club members, as proof of purchase receipts illustrated. Mr. Hoiriis and Ms. Lane continued to claim the school’s ownership over the DVDs. Their stance was that since the school owned the camera that was used to make the video, they therefore owned the video itself. In a meeting the point was brought up that: This would be akin to the school claiming ownership of a students painting, because the school owned the brushes and paint used to make it. Mr. Hoiriis and Ms. Lane changed that claim of ownership, from physical ownership, to intellectual property. “Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works” (World Intellectual Property Association). Mr. Hoiriis and Ms. Lane stated that the school owned the intellectual and creative property of the film club. This would mean that the school owns the scripts written, the performances given by the actors, the actual footage, editing, effects, etc. This point was argued extensively.

During this time of deliberation Mr. Hoiriis stated that the video was not allowed to be sold within the school or elsewhere, he also said that the video could not be made available to the public through any means. It was not allowed to be shown anywhere, to be available for check out at the public library, to be shown on the public access channel, or to be available through any other avenue.

Eventually a document was signed saying that the school had no ownership over the DVDs and that they were a product of Brickwall Productions. The DVDs were then returned. After the DVDs were signed over, Ms. Lane stated that film making is not an art and that there is no education involved in it. She was not open to argument on this subject and insists that there is no artistic, creative, academic, or educational merits in the medium of film making.

Upon pressing Ms. Lane on this issue she revealed that she had officially disbanded the club. This decision was made of her own volition without consulting the administration, or anyone else. Mr. Hoiriis was not aware of this until it was brought to his attention after the meeting.

Ms. Lane disbanded the club on the basis that there was no educational or artistic aspect to filmmaking. She has no issue with the Geek Club, Anime Club, Cooking Club, Drama Club, Thespian Society, or Camera Club, so why the filmmaking club is being targeted is unknown.

Mike Place, a film professor at a local college, wrote in a letter explicitly stating how film making is educational. He detailed how filmmaking enriches academics and demonstrated the ways in which it teaches core subjects such as reading, writing and mathematics.

The New Hampshire representative of the 21st Century Community Learning Grant (The grant that Project Promise operates by), does not feel that Ms. Lane’s decision was justified. She also made aware that there are several film clubs supported by the grant around the country. Many students, staff, and community members have given their support to the former members of the filmmaking club and a petition on the matter has garnered over 50 signatures from people who find Ms. Lane’s actions unacceptable.